Dr Emma Cockcroft
Associate Research Fellow

Key publications | Publications by category | Publications by year

Key publications



Cockcroft EJ, Williams CA, Jackman SR, Bassi S, Armstrong N, Barker AR (2018). A single bout of high-intensity interval exercise and work-matched moderate-intensity exercise has minimal effect on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in 7- to 10-year-old boys. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36(2), 149-155.

Abstract:
A single bout of high-intensity interval exercise and work-matched moderate-intensity exercise has minimal effect on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in 7- to 10-year-old boys

(C) 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor. and. Francis Group. The purpose of this study was to assess the acute effect of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) on glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and fat oxidation in young boys. Eleven boys (8.8 ± 0.8 y) completed three conditions: 1) HIIE; 2) work-matched MIE; and 3) rest (CON) followed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to determine glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity (Cederholm index). Fat oxidation was measured following the OGTT using indirect calorimetry. There was no effect for condition on plasma [glucose] and [insulin]. area under the curve (AUC) responses following the OGTT (P  andgt;  0.09). However, there was a "trend" for a condition effect for insulin sensitivity with a small increase after HIIE (P  0.04, ES  0.28, 9.7%) and MIE (P  0.07, ES  0.21, 6.5%) compared to CON. There was an increase in fat oxidation AUC following HIIE (P  0.008, ES  0.79, 38.9%) compared to CON, but with no differences between MIE and CON and HIIE and MIE (P  andgt;  0.13). In conclusion, 7- to 10-year-old boys may have limited scope to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance after a single bout of HIIE and MIE. However, fat oxidation is augmented after HIIE but not MIE.
 Abstract. Full text
Cockcroft EJ, Moudiotis C, Kitchen J, Bond B, Williams CA, Barker AR (2017). High-intensity interval exercise and glycemic control in adolescents with type one diabetes mellitus: a case study. Physiol Rep, 5(13).

Abstract:
High-intensity interval exercise and glycemic control in adolescents with type one diabetes mellitus: a case study.

Current physical activity guidelines for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly supported by empirical evidence and the optimal dose of physical activity to improve glycemic control is unknown. This case report documents the effect of acute high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) on 24-h glycemic control in three adolescents with T1D using continuous glucose monitoring. Results highlight varied individual response to exercise across the participants. In two participants both MIE and HIIE resulted in a drop in blood glucose during exercise (-38 to -42% for MIE and -21-46% in HIIE) and in one participant both MIE and HIIE resulted in increased blood glucose (+19% and + 36%, respectively). Over the 24-h period average blood glucose was lower for all participants in the HIIE condition, and for two for the MIE condition, compared to no exercise. All three participants reported HIIE to be more enjoyable than MIE These data show both HIIE and MIE have the potential to improve short-term glycemic control in youth with T1D but HIIE was more enjoyable. Future work with a larger sample size is required to explore the potential for HIIE to improve health markers in youth with T1D.
 Abstract.  Author URL Full text

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